All posts tagged Residency status

  • US Entry and Exit Dates – How to Check Your Travel History

    In order to prepare your US tax documents, you will need to know the exact dates on which you travelled in or out of the US.

    However, if you don’t know your travel history and you need to double-check the exact entry and exit dates, the good news is that you can easily do this online.

    The US Customs and Border Protection (USCBP) keeps a record of all nonresidents who travel to the country over the past 5 years.

    These documents also include the reason for their travel and the dates of their previous visits to the US.

    In this post, we will discuss how to track all your travel history paperwork.

    USA entry and exit dates

    When do I need my US travel history?

    Applications for a visa, or Green card, as well as filing a 1040NR tax return require that you know precisely when you entered and exited the US.

    If this information is not accurate, this could cause rejection or delays in visa applications, or other challenges when you file your tax return.

    Also, every non-American citizen who performs the“substantial presence test” may be classified as “resident” for tax purposes if they don’t know the exact days of arrival and departure.

    The correct determination of residency is a very important issue for every international student in the US. This impacts both the tax you have to pay and the documents you need when you file a tax return.

    Now, you can easily track your entry and exit dates in the US on the U.S. Customs and Border Protection I-94 website.

    You can easily determine your US tax residency status for free by using Sprintax.

    What is Form I-94?

    Form I-94 Arrival/ Departure record is an electronic or paper document which is issued by a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer to foreign nationals who enter the US.

    Since most people who enter the US are not US lawful permanent residents, Form I-94 is given to them upon arrival.

    It’s important to know that you need this form when you are leaving the US as this is how the government keeps track of your departure date and knows that you did not stay in the US beyond the period permitted by your visa.

    What to do if my I-94 is inaccurate?

    You will need to contact the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) as soon as possible to make the relevant change in the information.

    You can call 1-800-375-5283 for additional information.

     

    What to do if my l-94 is lost/stolen?

    This is usually easy to fix, but you will need to report the missing document to the local police station.

    You must also contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283) and apply for a replacement. In most cases, you should be able to download a copy of your travel record from CBP website at no charge.

    What information do I need to access my US travel history?

    To access your US travel history online, you will need:

    – Your first and last name
    – Passport number
    – Date of birth
    – Country of citizenship

    When you have this information, you can start with your US travel history check.

    How do I get entry and exit dates in the US?

    1. Go to US Customs and Border Protection (USCBP) homepage.
    2. Click on “Need history of your travel and departures”
    3. Click on Consent & Continue when the Security page pops up
    4. Then enter your personal information, such as Name, Date of birth and your passport number.
    5. On the next page, you will be able to see your travel history and print it.

    USA entry and exit dates FAQ

    Other Frequently Asked Questions

    Why is it necessary to enter all entries and exits to the US even prior to living in it? I have been visiting the US ever since I was a baby and I don’t have all the passports and visa from that time?

    Your residency status is determined by the complete history of all your visits to the US including any visits as a student, trainee, tourist and all other entries to the US from 1989 onwards.

    If you don’t remember or cannot locate the exact entry and exit dates to the US simply enter approximate ones.

    Тhe i94.gov is not showing my visits. It says there are no results for the traveller information.

    The i94 website will show all visits made with your current passport. If you changed your passport you will need your old passport number(s) to check all your visits.

    If you don’t remember or cannot locate the exact entry and exit dates to the US simply enter approximate ones.

    For the visit history on the residency page on Sprintax, should I include trips in and out of the country over winter break for example, even though I was on the same visa all the time?

    Yes, you need to include all entry and exit dates to the US, even short ones, as they are used for counting your days of presence in the US and determining your residency status.

    I’ve been to the US as a tourist before in 2012. Should I enter that as my record?

    Yes, you need to include all entry and exit dates to the US, as they are used for counting your days of presence in the US and determining your residency status.

    When doing my taxes through Sprintax, I was asked for my arrival and departure dates. How far back should you go with this information?

    We would need you to provide all of your residency information and all of your entry and exit dates in order to be able to correctly determine your tax residency.

    How far back do the entry and exit dates need to go?

    Your residency status is determined by the complete history of all your visits to the US including any visits as a student, trainee, tourist and all other entries to the US from 1989 onwards.

    When entering the history of all entries and exits to the US, how accurate does it have to be? I don’t know if I can remember the exact dates.

    It’s OK if you don’t enter the exact entry and exit dates if you don’t remember them however you need to be as precise as possible.

  • Your US Tax Residency Status Explained

    US bridge

    Determining your tax residency status is important, as it will decide how much tax you must pay while in the US.

    The most common mistake nonresidents make is filing their taxes as a resident. If a nonresident files as a resident they can claim benefits and receive refunds that they’re not entitled to. Incorrect filing breaks the terms and conditions of a nonresident visa, this can lead to fines and penalties and you may also jeopardise your future visa or green card applications.

    In this article, we will discuss everything you need to know about your residency and how you can determine your residency status.
    Continue reading “Your US Tax Residency Status Explained” »

  • I filed as a resident in 2018. I have since left the US. I received the CARES payment. What should I do?

    Filed as resident in 2018, but since then left the US and now received the CARES act stimulus check, what should I do?

    In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the US government rolled out the emergency CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act.

    Essentially, it is a stimulus package which provides workers (earning less than $75,000 per year) with a one-time payment of $1,200.

    The stimulus payment can only be claimed by US citizens, permanent residents and residents for tax purposes (individuals who can pass the Substantial Presence Test) who have a valid Social Security Number (SSN), who have filed their 2018 tax return (in 2019), or their 2019 return (in 2020) and who will be considered a qualifying resident alien for the 2020 tax year.

    For more details on how US residency for tax purposes is determined, check out this blog post.
    Continue reading “I filed as a resident in 2018. I have since left the US. I received the CARES payment. What should I do?” »

  • Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!

    How to file a nonresident tax return with Sprintax

    Are you a nonresident student in America? Do you find US tax to be confusing?

    Don’t worry, you’re not alone! Even for the most financially savvy US citizen, American tax can be pretty tricky.

    At Sprintax, we offer a 24/7 live chat service. Our chat team are on hand to guide our customers and answer all of their tax questions throughout the prep-process.

    Following the close of the 2018 tax season, we thought it would be a good idea to run the numbers on the most common questions our team have received throughout the year and answer them here in this handy blog!
    Continue reading “Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!” »

  • My state residency differs to my federal residency. How is this possible?

    We’re here to clear your residency confusion!

    All Foreign Nationals living, working or studying in the US are responsible for their personal compliance with the United States Federal and State tax laws and regulations.

    But what are these laws and regulations?

    Well, for starters, every foreign national living in the US is required to submit an annual income tax return. But the type of tax return you will need to file depends largely on where you live and work.
    Continue reading “My state residency differs to my federal residency. How is this possible?” »