All posts tagged Federal tax return

  • Breaking: Sprintax is Now LIVE For Nonresident Federal E-Filing!

    It has never been easier to file your nonresident US federal tax return.

    We are thrilled to announce that Sprintax – the only online solution for nonresident federal and state tax returns – is now live for Federal E-Filing.

    This means that, by completing the easy Sprintax questionnaire, you can file your federal return directly with the IRS online.

    What is E-Filing?

    Sprintax is now approved by the IRS to submit Federal tax returns electronically (E-Filing).

    In short, this means you no longer need to download, print and mail a physical copy of your tax return to the US tax office. Instead, you can now file your federal tax return without ever having to leave the comfort of your own home.

    It’s also important to note that, by E-Filing your tax return, you will receive your US tax refund much faster than you would if you filed a paper tax return.

    E-File your tax return with Sprintax

    How does E-filing with Sprintax work?

    When you complete the Sprintax questionnaire and proceed through the order breakdown and payment stage, you will be ready to submit your 2020 US tax return.

    If you wish to E-File your taxes, you must firstly confirm that you have not previously E-Filed your 2020 tax return before.

    You can then click the ‘Proceed with E-File’ button to move to the next step.

    E-File Authentication

    To E-File your tax return you must first electronically sign your tax return using the information requested on the screen.

    Before you can sign your return, we must verify your identity. To do so, we will ask you to provide information from your previous federal tax return.

    If you filed a federal tax return last year, you can either provide your prior year adjusted gross income or your self-selected 5-digit pin.

    You can find your adjusted gross income on line 35 of your 2019 1040NR or on line 10 of your 1040NR-EZ. Please ensure the information you provide here is correct.

    If you did not file a tax return for tax year 2019, please enter ‘0’ as your prior year adjusted gross income.

    If you filed an amended tax return for tax year 2019, please enter the adjusted gross income listed on the return you filed originally.

    Electronically signing your tax return

    You will be required to select any 5-digit number (other than 00000) to electronically sign your tax return. Ensure you keep a record of this pin in a safe place.

    You will need to acknowledge that this pin is your signature and that and that you are now authorising transmission of your return.

    Final steps

    Next, you must read the disclaimer and consent statements and confirm your agreement and that you have reviewed the information that you have entered and examined your tax return.

    You will also need to confirm that the social security numbers of each person on the return are correct.

    You must then sign the above consent disclosure by entering your date of birth.

    Finally, simply click ‘E-File My Return’ to electronically send your tax return to the IRS.

    Can I E-File my state taxes with Sprintax?

    No. You can only E-File your federal tax return with Sprintax.

    However, if you are required to file a state tax return, Sprintax will help you to prepare the documents you need.

    When you complete our questionnaire, our software will provide you with your completed state tax return.

    To file your tax return, simply download, print and sign your documents and mail them to the tax office.

    Can everyone E-File their federal taxes?

    No.

    You will not be able to file online if:

    1. You have an ITIN
    2. Any names or SSN do not coincide with the information provided at the About You step of the Sprintax questionnaire
    3. Any of your payment documents do not have an EIN
    4. Any of your W2 forms do not have a control number
    5. Any of your 1042-S forms do not have a unique code identifier
    6. You allocated some of your income as ‘earned outside the USA’
    7. You have capital gains income
    8. You have form 1099-NEC
    9. You have form 1099-MISC with box 4 higher than box 0
    10. You have included one of the following documents – Final payslip, 1099-DIV, 1099-INT or 1099-B
    11. You have self-employment income

    If you are not eligible to E-File your taxes, don’t worry. You can still download your completed forms from Sprintax and mail them to the IRS.

    Do I have to E-File my tax return?

    No. If you would prefer not to file your taxes online, you can file by mail instead. Simply download your tax return, print it, sign it, and mail it to the IRS.

    What else is new with Sprintax?

    With our new OCR feature, you will save a lot of time when filing your tax return this year.

    In short, you will no longer be required to manually enter details from your income documents into the Sprintax questionnaire.

    Instead, you can simply upload your income documents and our software will populate the required information into your tax return.

    When is the tax filing deadline?

    It is important to file your tax return before the 17 May (the 2021 tax deadline has been extended from 15 April due to COVID-19).

    If you owe the IRS money and you don’t file your tax return by the deadline, you may incur late filing fines and penalties from the IRS. You may also jeopardize your future US visa applications.

    What’s more, 70% of Sprintax users receive a tax refund. By not filing, you risk missing out on your tax refund.

    The average federal refund is $1,126. Do you really want to leave that kind of money in the US? Of course not!

    File your US tax return with Sprintax.

    Who must file tax documents in the US?

    Every nonresident in the US has a tax filing requirement.

    If you earned income in the US, you will be required to file a federal tax return. You may also have a state tax filing requirement.

    Nonresident aliens who are in the US on a J or F visa must file a Form 8843 “Statement of Exempt Individuals and Individuals with a Medical Condition” even if they received no income in the US.

    No matter what nonresident tax document you need to file, Sprintax can help you. Get started here.

    Why choose Sprintax?

    Sprintax will cater to all of your nonresident tax filing requirements.

    • We help more than 215,000 nonresidents (from over 200 nationalities) with their taxes every year
    • We are now live for Federal Tax Return E-Filing
    • Automatic generation of completed tax documents including federal, state and FICA tax returns, form 8843, tax return amendments and more
    • Your maximum US tax refund guaranteed – our average federal refund is $1,126
    • 24/7 Live Chat tax support

    How to get started

    To file your US federal tax return online with Sprintax, simply create your account or login here.

    Next, we will ask you a couple of easy questions about your time in the US and the income you earned.

    Our software will then automatically apply any treaty benefits or tax relief you are entitled to – minimizing your tax bill!

    You will then have the opportunity to either E-File or download your completed documents.

    It’s that easy! E-File your US taxes today!

  • Did you leave the US due to Covid-19? You could be due a tax refund!

    Covid-19 called a halt to countless peoples plans in 2020!

    Many nonresidents had to leave their adventures in foreign lands and travel home.

    If you were one of the people who had to leave the US due to the pandemic…we feel your pain!

    However, you should know that you still have tax filing obligations in the US!

    Lucky for you, you could be due a big tax refund! Continue reading “Did you leave the US due to Covid-19? You could be due a tax refund!” »

  • What income is taxable for nonresident aliens in the US?

    Are you a nonresident living in the US? We know it can be confusing to understand the tax system in your home country, let alone in a different one, so we are here to help explain what income is taxable for nonresidents in the US.

    As a foreign national you can be subject to one of two different systems of taxation in the US, depending on whether you are classified as a nonresident or resident alien in the US.

    If you are a nonresident alien, you are subject to US income tax only on your US source income and just like residents, you must report your income on US income tax returns.

    In this guide, we are going to take a closer look at the various different types of income which are taxable in the US and outline our tips on managing your tax requirements.
    Continue reading “What income is taxable for nonresident aliens in the US?” »

  • A Complete Tax Guide for Au Pairs in the U.S.

    Au Pair Taxes Explained by Sprintax

    According to the IRS (Internal Revenue Service), there are up to 12,000 au pairs in the US at any stage during the year (source).

    We’ve put this handy guide together to fill you in on everything you need to know about foreign au pairs and tax in the US.
    Continue reading “A Complete Tax Guide for Au Pairs in the U.S.” »

  • Your US Tax Residency Status Explained

    US residency for tax purposes guide

    Determining your tax residency status is important, as it will decide how much tax you must pay while in the US.

    The most common mistake nonresidents make is filing their taxes as a resident. If a nonresident files as a resident they can claim benefits and receive refunds that they’re not entitled to. Incorrect filing breaks the terms and conditions of a nonresident visa, this can lead to fines and penalties and you may also jeopardise your future visa or green card applications.

    In this article, we will discuss everything you need to know about your residency and how you can determine your residency status.
    Continue reading “Your US Tax Residency Status Explained” »

  • Top Tax Tips for Last-Minute Filers

    student with laptop

    The US tax deadline may have been extended until 15 July, but many will inevitably wait until the last minute to file their tax returns.

    International students must file a tax return as a condition of their visa. You may be subject to penalties and interest if you don’t do it.

    If you’ve procrastinated and haven’t done your taxes yet, you are not alone!

    But don’t worry! We are here to help with our top tax tips for last-minute filers.
    Continue reading “Top Tax Tips for Last-Minute Filers” »

  • US Tax deadline extended to 15 July 2020

    Due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, the IRS have announced a 90 day extension to the deadline to file and pay your federal taxes.
    Continue reading “US Tax deadline extended to 15 July 2020” »

  • How to File Your Nonresident Tax Return from Outside the US

    Need to file a US nonresident tax return from outside America?

    Don’t worry. You’re not alone! Countless nonresidents face this very predicament every year.

    Filing from outside the US can pose its own unique set of challenges. But, with some planning, organization and a little help from your friends at Sprintax, filing your documents can be easier than you think!

    In this handy guide, we’ve got 5 top tips to follow if you’re filing your nonresident tax documents from outside the US.
    Continue reading “How to File Your Nonresident Tax Return from Outside the US” »

  • US tax season survival guide for international students on F-1 visas

    US tax season guide for international students on F-1 visa

    While tax filing might not be the most exciting aspect of international student life in the US, the importance of completing these forms correctly cannot be underestimated.

    In fact, the way you handle your international student tax affairs will have a major impact on future Green Card and visa applications.

    With this in mind, we’ve created this handy tax guide for international students and scholars in the US on an F-1 visa.

    We’ve covered everything you need to know about tax returns, refunds, and how to stay in the taxman’s good books! So, let’s get started!

    To easily navigate this guide, we’ve listed the main covered topics in the table of contents below. Continue reading “US tax season survival guide for international students on F-1 visas” »

  • 给持F-1签证的国际学生的美国税收季节生存手册

    US tax season guide for international students on F-1 visa

    尽管纳税申报可能不是国际学生在美国生活中最令人兴奋的方面,但正确填写这些表格的重要性不容低估。

    事实上,您处理国际学生税务事务的方式将对您未来绿卡和签证申请产生重大影响。

    考虑到这一点,我们为持F-1签证在美国的国际学生和学者制作了这份方便的税务指南。

    我们已经涵盖了所有你需要知道的关于纳税申报,退款,以及如何留在税务人员的好书!那么,让我们开始吧!

    为了方便浏览本指南,我们在下面的目录中列出了主要涉及的主题。 Continue reading “给持F-1签证的国际学生的美国税收季节生存手册” »

  • Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!

    How to file a nonresident tax return with Sprintax

    Are you a nonresident student in America? Do you find US tax to be confusing?

    Don’t worry, you’re not alone! Even for the most financially savvy US citizen, American tax can be pretty tricky.

    At Sprintax, we offer a 24/7 live chat service. Our chat team are on hand to guide our customers and answer all of their tax questions throughout the prep-process.

    Following the close of the 2018 tax season, we thought it would be a good idea to run the numbers on the most common questions our team have received throughout the year and answer them here in this handy blog!
    Continue reading “Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!” »

  • Missed the US tax return deadline? Here’s what to do

    Filing your tax return late Sprintax

    Every nonresident alien in the US is obliged to file a federal tax return before the tax deadline, which is usually around 15 April (due to the Covid pandemic, the IRS tax filing deadline has been extended to 17 May in 2021).

    If you’re an international student or scholar in the US, by law you must file Form 8843 at least, but depending on your circumstances, you may also need to file a Federal tax return by filing a 1040NR, a State Tax return or two and maybe even a FICA return. Not filing a tax return could get you into a whole heap of trouble, leaving you with hefty tax fines and penalties, on top of possible problems getting US visas in the future.

    But what happens if you file your taxes late?

    Don’t panic! Nearly 30% of taxpayers are unable to organize their documents before the deadline. But you can still fix this!

    Here are a few important things you should consider if you expect to miss the deadline.

    Continue reading “Missed the US tax return deadline? Here’s what to do” »

  • Where’s My Tax Refund?

    USA flag and American dollars. American flag blowing in the wind and 100 dollars banknotes in the background. USA flag and American dollars. American flag blowing in the wind and 100 dollars banknotes in the background

    Filed your tax return and wondering where your refund is? Here’s how you can keep up to speed with your refund

    With your tax return safely filed, you’re probably wondering ‘how long will it be before I receive my tax refund?’

    Fortunately you can now get information about your tax refund online.

    Here’s what you need to know…
    Continue reading “Where’s My Tax Refund?” »

  • When can I expect my tax refund?

    Sprintax US tax

    How long does it take the IRS to process an international student tax return?

    Continue reading “When can I expect my tax refund?” »

  • Everything you wanted to know about US tax (but were afraid to ask!)

    Us international students tax questions

    You might be surprised to learn that, at present, there are around one million international students studying in the United States. What won’t surprise you however, is that each of these one million students have tax obligations in the United States.

    What are these obligations? This is where things get a bit tricky!

    If you’re an international student in the US you might not be too familiar with the local tax system. And it’s highly likely that you’ll have some questions about your tax obligations and what you’re entitled to. That’s why we’ve created this handy guide to US tax for international students and other nonresident aliens.
    Continue reading “Everything you wanted to know about US tax (but were afraid to ask!)” »