All posts in Tax Tips

  • Which tax form should I use: Form 1040, 1040NR or 1040NR-EZ?

    Coming to the US from a foreign country presents both thrills and challenges to every nonresident.

    One of the more common difficulties nonresidents face is filing their tax return.

    In this blog we’ll be discussing Forms 1040, 1040NR, 1040NR-EZ, and how they apply to each person’s situation.

    Form 1040 (NR & NR-EZ) figures out the total taxable income of the taxpayer and determines how much of a refund the person may be due.

    So, without further ado, let’s examine how to find out which form applies to you! Continue reading “Which tax form should I use: Form 1040, 1040NR or 1040NR-EZ?” »

  • A complete state-by-state guide to US taxes for international students

    In the US, there are different tax rules and laws in each individual state, as well as at a federal level.

    Depending on where you live, you may be required to file a state tax return. In this blog we will outline what you need to know about each state’s tax filing requirement.

    So, let’s start with the easy part.

    States with no income tax

    Nine US states don’t impose any income tax on income.

    This means that, if you live and work in one of the states below, only federal tax will be deducted from your income. You will not have to pay any state income tax.

    • Alaska
    • Florida
    • Nevada
    • New Hampshire (taxes only investment income, not earned income)
    • South Dakota
    • Tennessee (taxes only investment income, not earned income)
    • Texas
    • Washington
    • Wyoming

    While the states above don’t deduct individual income tax, they may still deduct taxes such as corporate tax, among others.

    What to do if you have a state filing requirement

    Meanwhile, if you work or invest in a state that has an income tax, it’s likely that you must file a state tax return. This is a separate document to your federal tax return. States are independent from one another in their taxing authority, and all state tax forms differ in some respects. In other words, the type of document you must file – as well as the deadline to file – differs from state-to-state. You can find a full list of everything you need to know below.

    *These dates are relevant to 2020 due to the outbreak of coronavirus which postponed the US tax deadline from 15 April until 15 July.

    It remains to be seen whether the dates will be the same for 2021 and onwards.*

    Alabama

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Alabama state tax return is 15 July 2020.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘40NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Arizona

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Arizona state tax return is 15 July 2020.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘104NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Arkansas

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Arkansas state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘AR1000NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    California

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your California state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘540NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Prepare your State tax return with Sprintax

    J-1 Covid-19 stimulus payment

    Colorado

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Colorado state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘104PN’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Connecticut

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Connecticut state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘Ct-1040NR/PY’ and ‘Schedule CT-SI’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Delaware

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Delaware state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘200-02’, as well as their federal tax return.

    District of Columbia

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Columbia state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘D40-B’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Georgia

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Georgia state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘500’ and ‘Schedule B’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Hawaii

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Hawaii state tax return is slightly later than other states in the US, with filing required by 20 July. However, all nonresidents are advised to file before this, and beat the tax deadline rush.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘N15’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Idaho

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Idaho state tax return is slightly earlier than the majority of the other states, with the deadline being 15 June.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘43’ and ‘Schedule B’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Illinois

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Idaho state tax return is slightly earlier than the majority of the other states, with the deadline being 15 June.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a ‘IL-1040’, and ‘Schedule NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Prepare your State tax return with Sprintax

    Indiana

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Indiana state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘IT40-PNR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Iowa

    State tax deadline: The tax deadline for filing your Iowa state tax return is slightly later than the majority of other states in the US, with filing required by 31 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘IA 1040’ and ‘IA 126’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Word "Tax" with clock on the office workplace.

    Kansas

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Kansas state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘K-40’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Kentucky

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Kentucky state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ’740NP’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Louisiana

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Louisiana state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ’IT-540B’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Maine

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Maine state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘1040ME’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Easy Oklahoma tax return

    Maryland

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Maryland state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘505NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Massachusetts

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Massachusetts tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘1-NR/PY’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Michigan

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Michigan state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘M1-1040’ and ‘Schedule NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Minnesota

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Minnesota state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘M1’ and ‘Schedule M1-NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Mississippi

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Mississippi state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ’80-205’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Missouri

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Missouri state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘MO-1040’ and ‘MO-NRI’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Montana

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Montana state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form and ‘M2’, as well as their federal tax return.Montana State tax refunds

    Nebraska

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Nebraska tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘1040N’ and ‘Schedule III’, as well as their federal tax return.

    New Jersey

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your New Jersey tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘NJ-1040NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    New Mexico

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your New Mexico tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘PIT’ and ‘PIT-B’, as well as their federal tax return.

    New York

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your New York tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘IT-203’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Prepare your State taxes with Sprintax

    North Carolina

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your North Carolina tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘D4000’ and ‘Schedule PN’, as well as their federal tax return.

    North Dakota

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your North Dakota tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘ND-1’ and ‘Schedule ND-1NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Ohio

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Ohio state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘IT 1040’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Oklahoma

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Oklahoma state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘511NR’ and ‘Schedule 511NR-1’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Oregon

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Oregon state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘OR-40-N’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Pennsylvania

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Pennsylvania state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘PA-40’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Prepare your State taxes hassle-free with Sprintax

    Pennsylvania state university

    Rhode Island

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Rhode Island state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘RI-1040NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    South Carolina

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your South Carolina state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘SC1040’ and ‘Schedule NR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Utah

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Utah state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘TC-40’ and ‘Schedule TC-40B’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Vermont

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Vermont state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘IN-111’ and ‘Schedule N-113’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Virginia

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Virginia state tax return is at an earlier date than the majority of states, with filing required by 1 June.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘763’, as well as their federal tax return.

    West Virginia

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your West Virginia state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘IT-1040’ and ‘Schedule A’, as well as their federal tax return.

    Wisconsin

    State tax deadline: The 2020 tax deadline for filing your Wisconsin state tax return is 15 July.

    State tax return: All nonresidents with a tax filing requirement should file a form ‘1NPR’, as well as their federal tax return.

    If you require additional time to file your tax returns after the new deadlines, you can request an extension to do so with the relevant state tax authorities.

    Who can help me prepare my state taxes?

    Sprintax can guide you through the often tricky tax process!

    When you create an account with Sprintax, our system will assist you in preparing fully-compliant Federal and State tax returns and also enable you to use any tax deduction and benefits that will allow you to claim your maximum legal tax refund!

    Prepare your State tax return with Sprintax

  • Keep your tax records when Tax season is over. Here’s why

    Here are the tax records you need to keep and how long you should keep them

    When tax season ends it can feel like a big weight has been lifted off your shoulders – an opportunity to exhale and relax (until it all starts again next year that is!) But before you expel all tax topics completely from your mind, there is one final task you must complete.
    Continue reading “Keep your tax records when Tax season is over. Here’s why” »

  • How to Track the Processing of Your North Carolina State Tax Return?

    NC tax refund

    North Carolina is one of the 43 states in America that taxes its residents’ individual income.

    You must file a state tax return if you are a nonresident alien and your income from North Carolina sources is greater than $0.

    If you have already filed your North Carolina state tax return ahead of the 15 July tax filing deadline, you may want to follow the progress of your return and the processing of your tax refund.

    In this guide, we’re going to show you exactly how you can track your return and let you know what to do if you have not yet filed your taxes.
    Continue reading “How to Track the Processing of Your North Carolina State Tax Return?” »

  • A Complete Tax Guide for Au Pairs in the U.S.

    Au Pair Taxes Explained by Sprintax

    According to the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) there are up to 12,000 au pairs in the US at any stage during the year (source).

    We’ve put this handy guide together to fill you in on everything you need to know about foreign au pairs and tax in the US.

    About the Au Pair Program

    What is Au Pair?

    An au pair is an individual between the ages of 18 and 26, who travels from their home country to live in the US with a family and work as a caregiver (foreign nanny). An au pair comes to the US as an Exchange Visitor on a J-1 visa and is not allowed to remain in the United States longer than one year.

    Working as an au pair is an unrivaled opportunity to experience the American way of life – and for those who are not native English speakers, it’s a chance to learn and practice the language.

    You can find more about the Au Pair program here.

    Au Pair Income

    Au Pairs in America receive a cash stipend (tied to the U.S. minimum wage) from the host family. The au pair stipend constitutes “wages” because an employer-employee relationship exists between the au pair and their host family.

    Au pairs must report this income to the IRS and it’s subject to income tax.

    One of the many challenges that an au pair may face when they arrive in the US is coming to terms with the US tax system.

    Do Au Pairs have to pay taxes?

    In short, yes.

    All payments that you have received as an au pair from your host family, which cover the cost of any required academic coursework, room and board, or compensation for childcare work are subject to income tax.

    As a nonresident, au pairs will owe tax on all of the money they earned from US sources.

    Although au pair wages are not subject to mandatory U.S. income tax withholding and reporting on form W-2, au pairs must file an income tax return.

    Filing an Income Tax Return

    You will need to apply for a Social Security Number (SSN) or for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN), whichever is applicable in your case, in order to file your US Federal tax return.

    In the United States, besides federal tax, there are also state taxes and local taxes. Whether you need to file a state tax return will depend on the tax rules of the state in which you lived and /or worked, as some states do not require you to pay state tax.

    In order to reduce your tax liability during filing, the IRS permit au pairs to pay tax in quarterly instalments. To do this, all you’ll need to do is submit Form 1040NR-ES (estimated tax return) to the IRS on a quarterly basis and enclose a cheque for the amount you are paying. You may also pay your tax in full at the end of the tax year with your 1040NR-EZ.

    Prepare your Au pair taxes hassle-free with Sprintax

    What taxes are Au Pairs exempt from?

    Because au pairs are paid for their work in the setting of a private home, they are not subject to mandatory US income tax withholding and reporting on Form 941 and W-2.

    Wages will also be exempt from social security and Medicare (FICA) taxes because of the au pair’s status as a nonresident alien. However, if you had previously been in the United States as a student, teacher, trainee, or researcher in F, J, M, or Q non-immigrant status, then you may be classed as a resident alien, meaning you may be subjected to these taxes.

    Tax deductions

    Most au pairs are considered nonresident aliens for tax purposes, so they are not eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit, the Hope Credit or the Lifetime Learning Credit.

    What happens if an au pair does not pay taxes?

    It’s important to note that, by not filing your tax return, you can severely jeopardize your chances of securing a US visa or Green Card in the future.

    How to pay taxes

    If the case arises where you end up owing additional taxes along with your return, you have various options to pay. The most common forms of paying are pay by check, bank transfer or your credit or debit card.

    You may need to prepare a payment voucher and mail it to the IRS with a check or money order if you choose this payment method.

    If you choose to pay with a payment voucher, Sprintax will provide the filled out form for you. You will find detailed information about the method you have chosen in your instructions.

    Check out this guide on what to do if you missed the tax deadline.

    How to file my US tax return as an Au pair

    Usually, you have until 15 April of every year to file your tax return, however – with the ongoing COVID19 pandemic causing chaos across the globe, the deadline for 2020 has been moved forward to 15 July.

    • In order to file your au pair tax return you need:
      Your Social Security Number (SSN) or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN);
    • Calculate how much you earned in the US during the previous calendar year. The simplest way is to multiply your weekly stipend with the number of weeks you worked as an au pair;
    • File form 1040NR-EZ with the IRS;
    • Send a payment to the IRS with the amount of any taxes owed.

    At Sprintax, our software has the capabilities to help you to prepare your federal tax return easily online. We will also assist you with your state tax return.

    By preparing your tax documents with Sprintax, you can also ensure that you receive your maximum tax refund! And with the average Sprintax user receiving a tax refund of $1,153, it’s easy to see why it’s worth your time checking to see what you are owed!

    With Sprintax you can:

    • Save time and stress!
    • Determine your residency status
    • Prepare a fully compliant US tax return
    • Maximize your State tax refund if available
    • Avail of our 24/7 Vita Qualified Live Chat facility

    Prepare your Au Pair tax return today!

  • US Entry and Exit Dates – How to Check Your Travel History

    In order to prepare your US tax documents, you will need to know the exact dates on which you travelled in or out of the US.

    However, if you don’t know your travel history and you need to double-check the exact entry and exit dates, the good news is that you can easily do this online.

    The US Customs and Border Protection (USCBP) keeps a record of all nonresidents who travel to the country over the past 5 years.

    These documents also include the reason for their travel and the dates of their previous visits to the US.

    In this post, we will discuss how to track all your travel history paperwork. Continue reading “US Entry and Exit Dates – How to Check Your Travel History” »

  • The top 5 mistakes nonresidents make on their tax returns and how to avoid them

    Woman Doing Finances at Home

    US tax is tricky and it is easy to make a mistake when filing your tax return.

    Such mistakes can be frustrating and lead to delays in both processing your tax return and retrieving your tax refund.

    In this guide, we’ll highlight the five most common mistakes made by nonresidents while filing their tax return and provide top tips on how to avoid them! Continue reading “The top 5 mistakes nonresidents make on their tax returns and how to avoid them” »

  • Your US Tax Residency Status Explained

    US bridge

    Determining your tax residency status is important, as it will decide how much tax you must pay while in the US.

    The most common mistake nonresidents make is filing their taxes as a resident. If a nonresident files as a resident they can claim benefits and receive refunds that they’re not entitled to. Incorrect filing breaks the terms and conditions of a nonresident visa, this can lead to fines and penalties and you may also jeopardise your future visa or green card applications.

    In this article, we will discuss everything you need to know about your residency and how you can determine your residency status.
    Continue reading “Your US Tax Residency Status Explained” »

  • I filed as a resident in 2018. I have since left the US. I received the CARES payment. What should I do?

    Filed as resident in 2018, but since then left the US and now received the CARES act stimulus check, what should I do?

    In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the US government rolled out the emergency CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act.

    Essentially, it is a stimulus package which provides workers (earning less than $75,000 per year) with a one-time payment of $1,200.

    The stimulus payment can only be claimed by US citizens, permanent residents and residents for tax purposes (individuals who can pass the Substantial Presence Test) who have a valid Social Security Number (SSN), who have filed their 2018 tax return (in 2019), or their 2019 return (in 2020) and who will be considered a qualifying resident alien for the 2020 tax year.

    For more details on how US residency for tax purposes is determined, check out this blog post.
    Continue reading “I filed as a resident in 2018. I have since left the US. I received the CARES payment. What should I do?” »

  • Top Tax Tips for Last-Minute Filers

    The US tax deadline may have been extended until 15 July, but many will inevitably wait until the last minute to file their tax returns.

    International students must file a tax return as a condition of their visa. You may be subject to penalties and interest if you don’t do it.

    If you’ve procrastinated and haven’t done your taxes yet, you are not alone!

    But don’t worry! We are here to help with our top tax tips for last-minute filers.
    Continue reading “Top Tax Tips for Last-Minute Filers” »

  • I filed an incorrect tax return. Should I file an amended return to fix it and how?

    How to amend your US tax return - Sprintax

    “Don’t worry if you made a mistake on your tax return or forgot to claim a tax credit or deduction. You can fix it by filing an amended return.” – The IRS

    Made an error on nonresident alien income tax return? Don’t worry, fixing it is not as difficult as you might think!

    US tax can be tricky – especially if you’re a nonresident who is not familiar with the American tax system. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) knows the tax code is complex, and that people make mistakes.

    A tax return can be considered ‘incorrect’ or ‘incomplete’ for a variety of different reasons. Simple things like forgetting to sign a form to big issues like misreporting income or incorrectly calculating a deduction can all affect the validity of a tax return. While making a mistake on your return is not necessarily a big deal, it is important that you rectify the situation by filing an amended tax return, where appropriate.

    If you realize that you made an error on a tax return you already filed or you have come across new information (for example you received an additional W-2 or 1042-S), simply file an amended tax return to make a correction.

    Continue reading “I filed an incorrect tax return. Should I file an amended return to fix it and how?” »

  • Nonresident aliens: Your guide to navigating the COVID-19 CARES Act Stimulus Payments

    Can I claim the CARES payment as a nonresident?

    Updated 7 May 2020

    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the US government has introduced the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act.

    In short, the CARES Act is a stimulus package which aims to support workers (earning less than $75,000 per year) with a one-time payment of $1,200.

    Married couples (who file jointly and earn less than $150,000) will receive $2,400 and families will also get $500 per child.

    Taxpayers who have filed US tax returns in 2018 or 2019 have already begun to receive CARES payments.

    With that in mind, in this guide, we’ll take a closer look at the CARES payment, who is entitled to receive it, and what you should do if you receive the payment when you are not eligible. 
    Continue reading “Nonresident aliens: Your guide to navigating the COVID-19 CARES Act Stimulus Payments” »

  • COVID-19, the CARES payment and the tax deadline – all of your non-resident tax questions answered!

    COVID-19 tax questions

    As a non-resident in the US, you probably have a lot of questions about tax.

    That’s why, at Sprintax, we offer a 24/7 Live Chat service. Our team are available any time day or night to support you and answer all of your tax questions.

    In this blog, we’ve compiled some of the most common tax questions that our team have received recently.
    Continue reading “COVID-19, the CARES payment and the tax deadline – all of your non-resident tax questions answered!” »

  • US Tax deadline extended to 15 July 2020

    Due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, the IRS have announced a 90 day extension to the deadline to file and pay your federal taxes.
    Continue reading “US Tax deadline extended to 15 July 2020” »

  • How to File Your Nonresident Tax Return from Outside the US

    Need to file a US nonresident tax return from outside America?

    Don’t worry. You’re not alone! Countless nonresidents face this very predicament every year.

    Filing from outside the US can pose its own unique set of challenges. But, with some planning, organization and a little help from your friends at Sprintax, filing your documents can be easier than you think!

    In this handy guide, we’ve got 5 top tips to follow if you’re filing your nonresident tax documents from outside the US.
    Continue reading “How to File Your Nonresident Tax Return from Outside the US” »

  • The new W-4 form explained

    The importance of correctly filling out US tax forms can often be disregarded as the process can be, let’s face it, quite boring!

    However, the importance of these forms cannot be underestimated, as it is absolutely crucial for any nonresident to abide by the strict tax laws in The States.

    In fact, the way that you handle your US tax affairs can play a big part in whether your future visa or Green Card applications succeed or not.

    In this blog we’ll lay out some of the key information you need to know before filling out the W-4 form, so that the correct amount of taxes is withheld from your paychecks.
    Continue reading “The new W-4 form explained” »

  • 5 Important US tax documents every international student should know

    Tax solutions for nonresidents in the US

    Let’s face it – tax is super boring!

    And when you move to the US as an international student or scholar, the local tax system will likely be the furthest thing from your mind.

    However, boring or not, compliance with the American tax authorities – the IRS – is crucial for any international student. In fact it’s one of the conditions of your visa! And how you handle your US tax affairs can play a big part in the outcome of your future visa or Green Card applications.

    But, by doing some research into US tax when you first arrive, you can save you a lot of hassle down the line.
    Continue reading “5 Important US tax documents every international student should know” »

  • Filing 1042-S – How to Prepare for Tax Season

    tax filing regulations of international students

    Preparing a 1042-S isn’t an easy task, and to make matters worse, filing incorrectly can lead to penalties, fines and unnecessary stress.

    But not to worry, today we will address some of the most common questions associated with filing a 1042-S: What is a 1042-S? How do I know what income to report? What deadlines should I be aware of when filing a 1042-S? Should I be aware of any changes in filing regulations since last year?
    Continue reading “Filing 1042-S – How to Prepare for Tax Season” »

  • Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!

    How to file a nonresident tax return with Sprintax

    Are you a nonresident student in America? Do you find US tax to be confusing?

    Don’t worry, you’re not alone! Even for the most financially savvy US citizen, American tax can be pretty tricky.

    At Sprintax, we offer a 24/7 live chat service. Our chat team are on hand to guide our customers and answer all of their tax questions throughout the prep-process.

    Following the close of the 2018 tax season, we thought it would be a good idea to run the numbers on the most common questions our team have received throughout the year and answer them here in this handy blog!
    Continue reading “Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!” »

  • Missed the US tax return deadline? Here’s what to do

    Filing your tax return late Sprintax

    Every nonresident alien in the US is obliged to file a 2019 tax return before the 15 July 2020 tax deadline (due to COVID-19 outbreak, the IRS tax filing deadline has been extended to 15 July in 2020).

    But what happens if you file your taxes late?

    Don’t panic! Nearly 30% of taxpayers are unable to organize their documents before the deadline. But you can still fix this!

    Here are a few important things you should consider if you missed the tax deadline.

    Continue reading “Missed the US tax return deadline? Here’s what to do” »

  • Where’s My Tax Refund?

    USA flag and American dollars. American flag blowing in the wind and 100 dollars banknotes in the background. USA flag and American dollars. American flag blowing in the wind and 100 dollars banknotes in the background

    Filed your tax return and wondering where your refund is? Here’s how you can keep up to speed with your refund

    With your tax return safely filed, you’re probably wondering ‘how long will it be before I receive my tax refund?’

    Fortunately you can now get information about your tax refund online.

    Here’s what you need to know…
    Continue reading “Where’s My Tax Refund?” »

  • On a Sports Scholarship in the US? Here’s What You Need to Know!

    international student sports scholarship tax

    Many athletes dream of having an opportunity to move to the US on a sports scholarship and study in one of their world-famous universities. If you are good enough to have been offered a scholarship, here’s what you need to know about taxes!

    Studying in the US is expensive and while most universities offer scholarships and many accept applications from international students. Over 600 US universities offer $20,000 worth of scholarships to international students. If you’d like to read more about scholarships for international students in the US check out this short post from the Sprintax blog.

    If you are an international student, in the US on a sports or athletic scholarship you are most likely considered a nonresident and you’re legally obliged to file a federal tax return even if you have received even $1cent.

    You may also be obliged to file a state tax return, depending on your personal circumstances.

    Prepare your US tax return online with Sprintax. 
    Continue reading “On a Sports Scholarship in the US? Here’s What You Need to Know!” »

  • PSA: It’s tax season! 5 things every international student can do to be prepared

    Tax_season_tips

    It’s never too early to start thinking about tax season. This is especially true when you consider that the April 15 tax filing deadline (due to Covid-19 outbreak, the tax filing deadline has been extended to 15 July in 2020) is only a matter of weeks away!

    There’s no doubt that, whether you have filed a tax return before, or this is your first year with a filing requirement, tax season can be a real headache.

    In this blog we’ll look at 5 things every international student can do to ensure their tax season runs as smoothly as possible.
    Continue reading “PSA: It’s tax season! 5 things every international student can do to be prepared” »

  • W-2 Tax Form – All you need to know

    W-2 form

    The tax filing deadline is on the horizon and quickly approaching! And most employees are now on the lookout for their W-2 tax form (Wage and Tax Statement). But why is this little form so important?

    Here’s everything you need to know.
    Continue reading “W-2 Tax Form – All you need to know” »

  • Can the college I choose to enroll in affect my US tax bill?

    State tax refunds Sprintax

    Want to work while studying in the US? It’s important to be aware that tax rates differ greatly from State to State.

    Continue reading “Can the college I choose to enroll in affect my US tax bill?” »

  • When can I expect my tax refund?

    Sprintax US tax

    How long does it take the IRS to process an international student tax return?

    Continue reading “When can I expect my tax refund?” »

  • Everything you wanted to know about US tax (but were afraid to ask!)

    Us international students tax questions

    You might be surprised to learn that, at present, there are around one million international students studying in the United States. What won’t surprise you however, is that each of these one million students have tax obligations in the United States.

    What are these obligations? This is where things get a bit tricky!

    If you’re an international student in the US you might not be too familiar with the local tax system. And it’s highly likely that you’ll have some questions about your tax obligations and what you’re entitled to. That’s why we’ve created this handy guide to US tax for international students and other nonresident aliens.
    Continue reading “Everything you wanted to know about US tax (but were afraid to ask!)” »

  • Moving to the US to study? Here’s 10 things to expect

    Moving to study in the USA

    From your daunting first day to excelling in the classroom – top tips to make the most of college life

    Are you planning a move to the US to study? You’re not alone.

    In fact, the US attracts 1,000,000 international students to its colleges and universities (of which there are more than 4000!) every year. And it’s very easy to see why.

    When you consider the standard of a university in America – Princeton, Yale, and Harvard, to name a tiny few – it’s very easy to see why the US is so incredibly popular with international students. American universities are amongst the best in the world and offer truly high-class education opportunities to their students. Away from the campus, the US boasts a large mix of cultures which makes it a really interesting place to study and live.

    But moving to a new country is always a big deal for any international student. And it can be hard to know what to expect.

    With this in mind, here are 10 things to expect when you arrive in the US to study.
    Continue reading “Moving to the US to study? Here’s 10 things to expect” »

  • How the ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’ affects every nonresident student in the US

    What you need to know about the GOP tax reform

    We examine how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) affects the tax obligations of US non-residents

    In November 2017, President Donald Trump introduced a ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’ that will have wide-ranging consequences for all US tax payers.

    There has been much confusion surrounding the new bill and tax payers have been keen to work out what the changes will mean for their pockets.

    Below we take a look at how the bill will affect the future tax obligations of US non-residents. Most of the changes have taken effect from January, 2018 and will change methods of withholding and the way non-residents will be taxed throughout 2018.

    It’s important to note that these amendments do not affect the 2017 tax return filing season.

    Continue reading “How the ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’ affects every nonresident student in the US” »