All posts in Sprintax

  • Key takeaways from our COVID-19 Tax Webinar!

    Sprintax COVID-19 tax webinar

    Updated 7 May 2020

    How coronavirus has affected nonresident tax compliance & how you can support your international students & scholars

    The US government introduced the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act in direct response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The act provides for a one-time stimulus payment of $1,200 to be paid to workers who are earning less than $75,000 per year.

    However, almost as soon as the CARES Act was introduced, a number of questions about the payment sprang up.

    What are the eligibility requirements for the payment, can nonresidents benefit from the CARES Act, and what should an international student do if they receive the payment in error – these are just a handful of the queries being asked every day by students and universities alike.

    In our webinar – How COVID-19 has affected nonresident tax compliance & how you can support your international students, scholars or J1 participants – we explore the common tax issues that COVID-19 has presented for international offices, payroll departments, visa sponsors and their nonresidents. We also answer some of the most common questions on the topic.

    Re-watch the webinar!

    US tax webinar for nonresident

    Missed the webinar? Don’t worry! You can watch it back right here.

    Here are the key takeaways from our COVID-19 Tax Webinar

    The CARES Act

    1. What is the Economic Impact Payment?

    In short, the CARES Act is a stimulus package which aims to support workers with a one-time payment.

    • Single individuals (earning less than $75,000 per year) will receive a payment of $1,200
    • Married couples (who file jointly and earn less than $150,000) will receive $2,400
    • Families will also get $500 per child

    2. Who is eligible for the Economic Impact Payment?

    An individual is eligible for this payment if they:

    1. Are a US Resident for tax purposes
    2. Have filed a resident tax return (Form 1040) in 2018 or 2019
    3. Will be considered a qualifying resident alien for the 2020 tax year
    4. Have an Adjusted Gross Income of between $75,000 and $99,000 (increasing for head of household and married filing jointly)
    5. Possess a valid social security number
    6. Not have been claimed as a dependent on another person’s tax return

    Read more about the CARES Act payment and who is entitled to it here.

    3. What about nonresident aliens, are they entitled to the Economic Impact Payment?

    No, nonresident aliens are not eligible to receive this payment.

    4. What is the difference between a resident and nonresident for tax purposes?

    Firstly, it’s important to note that residency for tax purposes is completely independent of visa or immigration status.

    Generally speaking, most international students, scholars and J-1 participants who are on F, J, M or Q visas are considered nonresidents for tax purposes.

    Here’s some important points to keep in mind:

    • F-1 and J-1 students are typically considered nonresident for their first 5 calendar years in the US
    • Individuals in the US under other categories of J visa are generally considered nonresidents for 2 out of the last 6 calendar years in the US
    • If they’ve been in the US for longer than the 5 or 2 year periods, the Substantial Presence Test will determine their tax residency

    Sprintax will guide students through the Substantial Presence Test and confirm if they were a resident or nonresident for that tax year.

    5. If an international student, scholar or J visa holder received the stimulus payment in error, what should they do?

    resident tax return smaller-min

    The first thing to note is that any international student or J-visa holder, who will not be considered a resident alien for the 2020 tax year, is not eligible for the payment and must return the payment to the IRS.

    International students and J-visa holders should also double check which tax return they prepared for 2018 and/or 2019. They will need to determine whether it was a Form 1040 (for residents) or a Form 1040NR (for nonresidents).

    If they filed a Form 1040 this means that they filed as a resident for that year.

    To double check that their tax return was filed correctly, the student can simply:

    • Login to Sprintax
    • Complete the free Substantial Presence Test. Our software will confirm whether the student was a resident or nonresident for that tax year

    If the individual has previously filed as a resident and the result of the Substantial Presence Test is that they should have filed as a nonresident, they must prepare and send an amended tax return (1040X) to the IRS.

    We recommend that the nonresident amends their incorrect return as soon as possible and this can be easily done online using Sprintax.

    Finally, they should also return the stimulus payment to the IRS. It’s a good idea to include a cover note to explain why they are returning the payment. Return of the payment should be done separately to filing the amended return.

    More details on how to return your payment to the IRS can be found here.

    Finally, the individual should ensure to keep personal copies of everything they send to the IRS.

    If the individual has previously correctly filed as a resident, and they will also be considered a resident for 2020, they will be entitled to keep the payment.

    6. An international student, scholar or J visa holder files correctly as a resident in 2018 or 2019. They leave the US at the end of 2019 and return to their home country. In April 2020 they receive the stimulus payment. What should the student do in this scenario?

    In this scenario, the individual will not be considered a resident alien for the 2020 tax year and should return the payment to the IRS.

    7. Will the IRS eventually be sending out notices to collect the $1,200 payments which were made in error?

    Yes, the IRS has provided guidance for individuals who have received the check in error.

    You can read more here about what to do if you received the check in error.

    8. Is the stimulus check considered taxable income?

    Generally, this type of payment is not taxable.

    However, the IRS have not yet provided final confirmation on whether the stimulus check will be considered taxable.

    9. If someone needs to amend their Federal tax return, do they also need to amend State tax return?

    Yes, depending on their personal circumstances, the individual may also need to amend their State tax return too.

    10. Can Sprintax help with amended tax returns?

    Yes, Sprintax can help nonresident students, scholars, J visa holders and professionals with their amended tax returns.

    You can learn more about how Sprintax can assist with tax return amendments here.

    Want to learn more about the Cares Act payment?

    Sign up for our FREE webinar here!

    J-1 Covid-19 stimulus payment

    Tax filing FAQs

    11. Who needs to file Form 8843?

    Filing a Form 8843 is the minimum requirement for all nonresidents.

    Students and scholars as well as J visa holders need to file Form 8843 irrespective of whether they have received income or not.

    Read more about Form 8843 here.

    12. What are the filing requirements for nonresidents who receive housing or housing allowances?

    Generally, this is considered to be taxable and reportable.

    If the nonresident earns more than $0 in taxable US income, they need to file a Federal tax return if they are a nonresident for tax purposes. They may also have a State filing requirement.

    You can find more information here.

    13. What should a nonresident do if they are filing from overseas? Is e-filing available?

    E-Filing options are limited for nonresident students who are filing from outside the US. Most students will be required to physically mail their tax returns to the IRS.

    It’s important to factor in that delivery times will potentially be delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. This is why it’s a good idea for a student to file their tax documents as soon as possible and use a registered delivery service when mailing the documents from overseas.

    You can find more advice on filing from overseas here.

  • Nonresident aliens: Your guide to navigating the COVID-19 CARES Act Stimulus Payments

    Can I claim the CARES payment as a nonresident?

    Updated 7 May 2020

    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the US government has introduced the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act.

    In short, the CARES Act is a stimulus package which aims to support workers (earning less than $75,000 per year) with a one-time payment of $1,200.

    Married couples (who file jointly and earn less than $150,000) will receive $2,400 and families will also get $500 per child.

    Taxpayers who have filed US tax returns in 2018 or 2019 have already begun to receive CARES payments.

    With that in mind, in this guide, we’ll take a closer look at the CARES payment, who is entitled to receive it, and what you should do if you receive the payment when you are not eligible. 

    Table of Contents:

    As always, if you have any questions about US tax, our Live Chat team are available to support you 24/7. Just get in touch!

    Who is entitled to receive the CARES payment?

    In short, the CARES Act can be claimed by US citizens, permanent residents and residents for tax purposes (individuals who can pass the Substantial Presence Test) who have a valid Social Security Number (SSN) and who have filed their 2018 tax return (in 2019), or their 2019 return (in 2020) and who will be considered a qualifying resident alien for the 2020 tax year.

    Are nonresident aliens entitled to avail of the CARES Act?

    No. Nonresident aliens are not eligible to receive this stimulus.

    You will also not be eligible for this payment if you are:

    • An individual who can be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer
    • An estate or trust
    • Part of a married couple where one partner has an SSN and the other has an ITIN or no number (unless one spouse is a member of the armed forces)

    How can I determine whether I am a resident or nonresident alien for tax purposes in the US?

    Can I claim CARES without green card?

    In short, you are a resident alien for tax purposes if you pass either the Green Card or Substantial Presence Tests:

    The Green Card Test

    If you hold a Green Card you are authorized to live and work in the US on a permanent basis and are considered a resident alien for tax purposes.

    The Substantial Presence Test

    Alternatively, if you spend 31 days in the US during the current year and 183 days during the three-year period that includes the current year and the two years immediately before that, you will also be considered a resident alien.

    However, it’s important to note that there are exemptions for time spent in transit (less than 24 hours in the US), time during which the person could not leave because he or she required medical treatment, as well as for teachers and students (on F, J, M, or Q visas) who haven’t stayed in the US beyond a certain period of time.

    Complete the Substantial Presence Test for free with Sprintax.

    In Summary

    If you visited the US to live, study or work as a nonresident – for example as an international student or J-1 program participant – and you do not pass the Substantial Presence Test, you will not be entitled to benefit from the CARES Act.

    Are F-1 students eligible for stimulus checks?

    I’m an international student in the US. If I pass the Substantial Presence Test, will I be entitled to receive a stimulus check?

    Can nonresidents claim covid payment?

    The IRS has not published any information which excludes the ‘international’ community in the US from benefiting from the CARES Act.

    So, if you pass the Substantial Presence Test, and you have been in the US long enough to be considered a resident for tax purposes, it is likely that you will be entitled to receive a stimulus check.

    In 2018 I mistakenly filed my tax return as a resident. I should have filed as a nonresident alien. I have now received the CARES payment. What should I do?

    Firstly, don’t worry, you are not alone!

    If you filed as a resident by mistake, all you need to do is file an amended tax return for each year that you filed incorrectly and pay any tax liability that you owe.

    The IRS receives thousands of amended returns each year. The process of filing is relatively straightforward and is very easy to do online with Sprintax.

    If you believe that you have received the stimulus payment in error, it is probably best to return the payment to the IRS.

    Can I claim the Cares payment?

    How to return the CARES stimulus check you received in error

    It is important to return the stimulus payment if you believe that you received it in error.

    You should return the payment separately to your amended return. In other words, the IRS is advising that you do not add the CARES payment to the check or electronic transfer you submit to cover your tax liability.

    Instead you should follow the directions below.

    If you received the payment as a paper check and have not yet cashed it:

    1. Write “Void” in the endorsement section on the back of the check.
    2. Mail the voided Treasury check immediately to the appropriate IRS location listed below.
    3. Don’t staple, bend, or paper clip the check.
    4. Include a note stating the reason for returning the check.

    If you received the payment as a paper check and cashed it, or if you received the payment as a direct deposit:

    1. Submit a personal check, money order, etc., immediately to the appropriate IRS location listed below.
    2. Write on the check/money order made payable to ‘U.S. Treasury’ and write ‘2020EIP’, and your taxpayer identification number (social security number, or individual taxpayer identification number).
    3. Include a brief explanation of the reason for returning the payment.

    Where to return the payment?

    If you live in:

    1. Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire or Vermont:

         You should mail to this address: Andover Refund Inquiry Unit, 310 Lowell St Mail, Stop 666A, Andover, MA 01810.

    2. Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky or Virginia:

         You should mail to this address: Atlanta Refund Inquiry Unit, 4800 Buford Hwy, Mail Stop 112, Chamblee, GA 30341.

    3. Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma or Texas:

         You should mail to this address: Austin Refund Inquiry Unit, 3651 S Interregional Hwy 35, Mail Stop 6542, Austin, TX 78741.

    4. New York:

        You should mail to this address: Brookhaven Refund Inquiry Unit, 5000 Corporate Ct. Mail Stop 547, Holtsville, NY 11742.

    5. Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin or Wyoming:

         You should mail to this address: Fresno Refund Inquiry Unit, 5045 E Butler Avenue, Mail Stop B2007 Fresno, CA 93888.

    6. Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio or West Virginia:

         You should mail to this address: Kansas City Refund Inquiry Unit, 333 W Pershing Rd, Mail Stop 6800, N-2, Kansas City, MO 64108.

    7. Alabama, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota or Tennessee:

         You should mail to this address: Memphis Refund Inquiry Unit, 5333 Getwell Rd Mail, Stop 8422, Memphis, TN 38118.

    8. District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, Pennsylvania or Rhode Island:

         You should mail to this address: Philadelphia Refund Inquiry Unit, 2970 Market St, DP 3-L08-151, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

    9. A foreign country, U.S. possession or territory*, or use an APO or FPO address, or file Form 2555 or 4563, or are a dual-status alien:

        You should mail to this address: Austin Refund Inquiry Unit, 3651 S Interregional Hwy 35, Mail Stop 6542 AUSC, Austin, TX 78741

     

    Finally, it’s a good idea to include a cover note with your amended tax return to confirm why you are returning the payment.

    You should also keep copies of everything that you send to the IRS – both physical and electronic. They may be required for any visa applications you submit in future.

    I filed as a resident in 2018 but I have since left the US. I received the CARES payment to my American bank account. Am I entitled to keep this money?

    Countless international students and scholars who had filed (either correctly or incorrectly) as residents for the 2018 tax year, and since left the US, have received the $1,200 payment.

    However, if you have left the US and you will not be considered a qualifying resident alien for the 2020 tax year, you are not eligible for this payment.

    In this scenario, you should return the payment to the IRS.

    How do I file an amended US tax return?

    How to file an amended US tax return

    You should file a Form 1040X in order to amend the federal income tax return that you filed previously.

    Form 1040X is two pages long and you are only required to include new or updated information.

    You will also find a space where you can write an explanation as to why you are amending your return.

    Here’s everything you need to know about amending a tax return

    Who can help me file an amended US tax return?

    You can easily amend your 2018 or 2019 US tax return using Sprintax!

    You can check our step by step guide to using Sprintax to amend your tax return.

    Amend Your Nonresident Tax Return with Sprintax

     

     

     

     

    Subscribe to the Sprintax Blog!

    US tax can be confusing. Especially for nonresidents!

    That’s why, if you’re an International Student or J-1 participant in the US, or you work in a University International Student Office, you should subscribe to the Sprintax blog.

    You’ll find tons of useful content for nonresidents. We cover tax, student life, acclimatizing to the US and much more.

    So what are you waiting for? Sign up today and never miss a thing!





  • Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!

    How to file a nonresident tax return with Sprintax

    Are you a nonresident student in America? Do you find US tax to be confusing?

    Don’t worry, you’re not alone! Even for the most financially savvy US citizen, American tax can be pretty tricky.

    At Sprintax, we offer a 24/7 live chat service. Our chat team are on hand to guide our customers and answer all of their tax questions throughout the prep-process.

    Following the close of the 2018 tax season, we thought it would be a good idea to run the numbers on the most common questions our team have received throughout the year and answer them here in this handy blog!
    Continue reading “Revealed: the 14 US tax questions every nonresident student asks us!” »

  • Which nationality claimed the largest US tax refund with Sprintax in 2019? The results are in!

    Nonresident Tax returns Sprintax

    At Sprintax we specialize in US tax prep and securing tax refunds for international students and J-1 program participants.

    But just how many tax returns do we prepare each year? And how much money can our customers claim in tax refunds?

    With tax season 2018 firmly behind us, we thought this would be a good time to crunch some numbers and find out!

    Here’s what we found…
    Continue reading “Which nationality claimed the largest US tax refund with Sprintax in 2019? The results are in!” »

  • Utilizar TurboTax para reclamar tu reembolso de impuestos J1 es ilegal

    Testimonial image for Sprintax

    Es difícil imaginar algo peor que el IRS (Internal Revenue Service, Servicio de Ingresos Internos) después de la experiencia J1 de tu vida.

    Sin embargo, esto es exactamente lo que puede suceder si presentas una declaración de impuestos incorrecta de Estados Unidos.
    Continue reading “Utilizar TurboTax para reclamar tu reembolso de impuestos J1 es ilegal” »

  • Is Sprintax Safe?

    How to securely file your tax return and retrieve your refund 

    Continue reading “Is Sprintax Safe?” »

  • Introducing Sprintax TDS – Tax Determination Software

    How much tax should an international student be paying?

    Tax. Granted, not the most exciting topic in the world. But its importance can never be called into question.

    Over recent years the proper documentation and withholding of payments to non-resident students and scholars has become an increasingly important issue for US educational institutions.

    How much tax should an international student being paying? Are they entitled to any reliefs or deductions? Who can help them handle their US tax?

    Finally there is an easy to manage, easy to use solution which makes US tax easy for international students – Sprintax TDS.
    Continue reading “Introducing Sprintax TDS – Tax Determination Software” »

  • Using TurboTax to Claim Your J1 Tax Refund is Illegal

    Testimonial image for Sprintax

    It’s hard to imagine anything worse than the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) sniffing around after your J1 experience of a lifetime.

    But this is exactly what can happen if you file an inaccurate US tax return.

    If you worked in the US on a J1 visa, then chances are you are legally obliged to file your US tax return by the Apr 15 deadline.

    So for example, if you’re on a J1 in 2018, then you should file your tax return by April 15 2019. If you file your US taxes correctly, you won’t run into any trouble later on. This is important if you ever wish to return to the US on another visa or for a holiday.

    If you go to US on a J1 visa, you’ll be considered a non-resident for tax purposes and must file as a non-resident.
    Continue reading “Using TurboTax to Claim Your J1 Tax Refund is Illegal” »

  • Revealed: over 125k filed their US tax return with Sprintax in 2018!

    Sprintax international students US tax returns

    Every international student who studied in the US in 2017 was required to file a tax return ahead of the April 2018 deadline.

    A lot of international students find US tax to be very daunting. So filing a compliant tax return on time is, for many, no easy feat.

    It’s hard enough to come to terms with the tax system in your own country. But then, when you move to the US to study, you have to handle the US tax system too!

    Thankfully a solution is on hand.

    The easiest way for any international student to file a US tax return is to choose Sprintax.
    Continue reading “Revealed: over 125k filed their US tax return with Sprintax in 2018!” »

  • 2018 Tax Report

    Sprintax Tax Report 2018 Infographic

  • How the ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’ affects every nonresident student in the US

    What you need to know about the GOP tax reform

    We examine how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) affects the tax obligations of US non-residents

    In November 2017, President Donald Trump introduced a ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’ that will have wide-ranging consequences for all US tax payers.

    There has been much confusion surrounding the new bill and tax payers have been keen to work out what the changes will mean for their pockets.

    Below we take a look at how the bill will affect the future tax obligations of US non-residents. Most of the changes have taken effect from January, 2018 and will change methods of withholding and the way non-residents will be taxed throughout 2018.

    It’s important to note that these amendments do not affect the 2017 tax return filing season.

    Continue reading “How the ‘Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’ affects every nonresident student in the US” »

  • Sprintax at NAFSA 2017 Annual Conference & Expo

    Our Sprintax team is thrilled to be attending the 2017 NAFSA conference!

    This year the annual conference & expo is taking place in Los Angeles, California and is attended by international education professionals from more than 150 countries.
    Continue reading “Sprintax at NAFSA 2017 Annual Conference & Expo” »

  • Massachusetts state tax module for 2016 tax preparation is live!

    We are happy to announce that the Massachusetts state tax module for 2016 is live!
    Continue reading “Massachusetts state tax module for 2016 tax preparation is live!” »

  • NY, RI, NC, MI, OH state tax modules for 2016 tax preparation are out!

    Following the release of 4 state tax modules in January (California, Virginia, Indiana and Missouri), we are happy to announce that five more modules are available!

    You can now prepare and download your nonresident tax returns for 2016 for New York, Rhode Island, North Carolina, Michigan and Ohio.
    Continue reading “NY, RI, NC, MI, OH state tax modules for 2016 tax preparation are out!” »

  • State tax modules for California, Virginia, Indiana and Missouri for 2016 tax preparation are out!

    We are very pleased to announce that the first four state tax modules for 2016 tax preparation are out now.

    You can prepare and download your 2016 tax returns for California, Virginia, Indiana and Missouri by entering your existing account or creating a new one for new users of Sprintax.
    Continue reading “State tax modules for California, Virginia, Indiana and Missouri for 2016 tax preparation are out!” »

  • 2016 Tax Season A Fantastic Success!

    With the 2017 tax filing season open, it’s time to take a look back at the 2016 season and what we achieved.

    Successful season for Sprintax
    Continue reading “2016 Tax Season A Fantastic Success!” »

  • The 2016 Tax Year is Live!

    We’re excited to announce that the 2017 tax filing season is open and Sprintax is up and running!

    International students and scholars, and non-resident professionals – you can now use Sprintax to prepare your non-resident tax returns for the 2016 tax year. Sprintax can help you prepare your Federal, State, and FICA tax returns to ensure you stay fully compliant.
    Continue reading “The 2016 Tax Year is Live!” »

  • Sprintax at NAFSA 2016 Regional Conferences

    Following the national conference earlier in the year, the 11 NAFSA regions held their conferences in late October and early November. These events are excellent opportunities for those involved in international education and exchange to network with experts and business partners and stay current with the latest trends.
    Continue reading “Sprintax at NAFSA 2016 Regional Conferences” »

  • 2016 Sprintax Customer Survey Results Now Available

    sprintax-customer-survey-2016

    At Sprintax, we believe the best way to improve our service is to listen to our customers. We constantly strive to provide them the highest quality service and their feedback is vital to achieve this.

    For the 2nd year we launched Customer Satisfaction Survey and thousands of our customers took part in it to tell what they really think of Sprintax.
    Continue reading “2016 Sprintax Customer Survey Results Now Available” »

  • Sprintax at NAFSA 2016 Annual Conference & Expo

    This year the team at Sprintax continued our tradition and attended the annual NAFSA (Association of International Educators) Conference.

    This year the annual conference & expo took place in Denver and again confirmed its status as the largest international educational conference in the world, gathering attendees from over 100 countries.
    More than 400 institutions and 10,000 international educational professionals from across the globe joined the conference for the chance to exchange ideas, network, and explore the trends that are shaping the future of education.
    Continue reading “Sprintax at NAFSA 2016 Annual Conference & Expo” »

  • 2015 is Best Sprintax Season to Date

    The 2015 US tax season is long over and it is time to take stock of the season and look at the big picture – through our eyes and through the eyes of our customers and partners.
    Continue reading “2015 is Best Sprintax Season to Date” »

  • Tell-A-Friend Competition Winner

    We’re delighted to announce the winner of an iPad Air in our first Tell-a-Friend Competition is Yeh-Hsing Lao from Taiwan!

    Continue reading “Tell-A-Friend Competition Winner” »

  • Tax Rules for International Students in the US

    tax tips for students

    The tax you pay in the US is determined by your status as a resident for tax purposes.
    Continue reading “Tax Rules for International Students in the US” »

  • Your Frequently Asked Tax Questions Answered

    US Nonresident Tax questions answered
  • Filing Your U.S. Tax Return: 5 Things You Should Know

    filing your taxes

    As an international student in the U.S., you are obliged to file a federal and state tax return for each year you are present in the U.S. Even if you have earned no U.S. sourced income, you still need to file a form 8843. All non-resident aliens in the U.S. under F-1, F-2, J-1, or J-2 and other non-immigrant exchange program status must file form 8843.
    Continue reading “Filing Your U.S. Tax Return: 5 Things You Should Know” »

  • The 2015 Tax Year is Live!

    U.S. tax return

    International students and scholars – you can now use Sprintax for your 2015 U.S. tax returns!

    We’re delighted to announce that the 2015 tax filing season is now open and you can use Sprintax to file your non-resident tax returns. Sprintax is for international students and scholars in the U.S. and will help you prepare your Federal, State, and FICA tax returns to ensure you stay fully compliant with the IRS and obligations of your visa.

    When you use Sprintax, we’ll check for income tax deductions, tax treaty benefits, personal allowances, and tax credits to make sure you get the highest refund possible.
    Continue reading “The 2015 Tax Year is Live!” »

  • Sprintax at NAFSA Regional Conferences

    Every year, NAFSA, the Association of International Educators, holds conferences in each state in October and November. These conferences give those involved in education the opportunity to meet, network, and stay up-to-date with the latest trends.

    This year, Sprintax were delighted to be represented by Jennifer Gallagher in Boise (Idaho), Cincinnati (Ohio), Savannah (Georgia), and Honolulu (Hawaii). Jennifer raffled off candy, battery packs and cookies. She also donated battery packs to the silent auctions at each conference to raise money for the region.
    Continue reading “Sprintax at NAFSA Regional Conferences” »

  • US Taxes for International Students

    Regardless of the fact that you probably don’t classify as a US citizen, you’re required by US taxation law to file a tax return.
    Continue reading “US Taxes for International Students” »

  • Getting a Student Visa for the US

    If you want to study in the US as an international student, you’ll need a student visa. Your course of study and the school you want to attend will determine if you need to apply for an F-1 or M-1 visa.

    Continue reading “Getting a Student Visa for the US” »

  • Sprintax Survey Results are in!

    We always put our customers first and strive to offer the highest quality customer service and meet the highest standards when it comes to customer satisfaction. Developing a service that customers are happy with is not just a one time project but a long process with continuous improvement.

    That’s why every season we carefully plan and implement innovations to enhance the customer experience and make Sprintax software even more easy-to-use and customer-friendly.

    Continue reading “Sprintax Survey Results are in!” »