Archive for October, 2015

  • 3 Awesome Ways Students Celebrate Halloween in the US

    Halloween in the US

    Students in the US have really embraced the Celtic tradition of Halloween and as an international student in the US, you’ll get to experience first-hand just how much they like to celebrate.

    So…exactly how big of a deal is it?

    Halloween is a HUGE deal in the US, with Americans spending over $7 billion on the holiday last year, including more than $2 billion on candy and around $2.8 billion on costumes!

    Here’s a breakdown of Halloween spending in the US:

    sprintax infographic

    If you haven’t experienced Halloween in the US yet, you’re definitely in for a treat! The mass immigration of Irish and Scottish in the 1800s dramatically increased the popularity of this Celtic tradition and it’s now celebrated by millions of people in the country on October 31st each year.

    On this night, it’s estimated that around 170 million Americans start carving pumpkins, put on their best fancy dress, and revel the night away at a party or trick or treat to celebrate this tradition.

    Being a student at Halloween

    Students in the US have really embraced Halloween and international students are always welcome to join in the festivities. It may be your first Halloween but you’ll get to experience an entirely new type of fun!

    As well as small house parties, you may come across ‘’block parties’’, where celebrations take place across several street blocks. For example, in Athens, Ohio, the annual Halloween block party spans a number of blocks and around 10,000-30,000 people in fancy dress descend upon the city, almost doubling the population. It’s so big now that the University of Ohio will only let each student have one guest stay for the weekend!

    1. Parties

    From house parties to Halloween balls and haunted houses, there are always lots of ways to celebrate. For students in the US, this is one of the biggest party seasons of the year and you’ll find many fraternities, sororities, and student organizations holding Halloween parties where the students get to show off their scariest costumes.

    Pennsylvania State University hosts a week long “pumpkin festival” each year dedicated to the art of pumpkin carving. The festival also has music, food, and crafts alongside the pumpkin carving competition.

    Every Halloween, Texas A&M University takes students on a trip through the “haunted woods”. The funds from the trail go to charity so patrons have the chance to be philanthropic whilst getting the fright of their lives.

    Check out some of the best university Halloween parties in the US here.

    2. Haunted Houses

    Do you enjoy a good fright? If so, you’re in luck, because the US is home to some of the best haunted houses in the world.

    Frightland in Middleton, Delaware, has eight different and uniquely terrifying haunted attractions, from a zombie ghost town to a haunted barn and more.

    Erebus in Pontiac, Michigan, houses four stories of horror and Philadelphia’s Terror Behind the Walls is set within a now defunct US prison believed to be haunted by former inmates.

    Here is a list of some of the top haunted houses and attractions in the US.

    3. Horror Movies

    Another way US students like to celebrate is by watching a horror film, for example, Georgetown University screens the Exorcist each year in honor of the scenes that were filmed on campus. So why not grab a bucket of popcorn and enjoy a scary night at the movies?

    As you can see from above, there are lots of ways to get into the Halloween spirit. What could be better than dressing up, decorating the house, and heading to a party?!

    Have fun and happy Halloween!

  • Food on a Budget

    With the rising cost of books and accommodation, being a student can be a costly affair. One of the best ways to stick to your budget is to save money on food.

     

    1. Keep it simple

    Keep your meals simple. Instead of buying processed foods, ditch the pot-noodles and buy basic staples such as rice, beans, and pasta. They’re cheaper, will last longer, and are healthier for you!

    Shop in cheap chain supermarkets such as Wegmans, Trader-Jos, and Walmart, and try your local fruit and vegetable markets and stores for fresh, cheap produce.

     

    2. Eat Healthy

    Eat three square meals a day, including a healthy breakfast to keep you from pining after that croissant. Cook your meals from scratch instead of buying expensive ready-meals and try to incorporate at least one fresh vegetable or fruit into each meal.

     

    3. Shop smart

    Don’t shop when you’re hungry! Shop at times when prices will be reduced and look out for deals.

    • Do your shopping in the evenings for reduced prices
    • Look for items like baked goods that are reduced to clear
    • Buy store-branded products
    • Get fruit and vegetables in-season
    • Keep one day to do your weekly shop

     

    4. Go Vegetarian

    Meat is expensive, so going on a vegetarian diet, even for just a few days a week, will save you money. Meat-free Monday is fast becoming a trend! If you want to buy meat, shop at the local butchers or meat market to find deals.

     

    5. Learn to cook

    Make your own juices, sandwiches, and coffee. This will save you from wasting money in the canteen and you can make your own meals in a matter of minutes.

     

    6. Look for deals

    Feel like eating out? Try the daily deal sites for discounts or go to the restaurant early to catch the early bird. Tipping is mandatory in the US so don’t forget to budget for at least a 15% tip. Also, be aware some restaurants will add a sales tax at the till!

     

    Bon apetit!

  • Getting a Job in the US

    Every student comes to the US with dreams and ambitions. Here are some tips to turn your dream job into a career:

     

    Plan your Career

    Be patient – Rome wasn’t built in a day! Get networking–it will help you gain useful contacts. Most importantly, do what you love– choose a job you love, and you’ll never have to work a day in your life!

     

    Start Your Search

    Focus on what you want to get from your career. Set goals and patiently execute them one by one and aim high. Search for jobs in the newspapers, employment centres, and on websites such as college.monster.com, specifically for recent graduates.

     

    Resume Vs CV

    A US CV is usually called a ‘resume’, and is different to the CV that you’re used to.

    Here’s why:

    A CV showcases your experience and is a ‘story’ about your academic and professional life, while a resume is a much shorter document with highlights of your academic life and career.

    Resumes should be one page long, and include a short, chronological list of previous experience and education. Get some good references from within the US if you can.

     

    Going for an interview

    Once you get the interview, remember these tips:

    • Don’t be late!
    • Research the company thoroughly
    • Practice your answers
    • Ask some questions
    • Look clean and professional

     

    And lastly, don’t forget to show your enthusiasm and let them know you really want the job!